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Abandonment of the centre ground

25 May 2016 - 21:35
Source: foxnews.com

The Austrian presidential election brought the message straight home. The centre seems to be breaking up. Even though a respectable Green outpaced an energetic right-wing populist by the slimmest of margins, the outcome left no doubt about its symbolism. The Socialist and Christian Democratic parties, the traditional contenders for power in Austria, found themselves sidelined. And the populist right has moved into the heart of the political system. Successive crises have prepared the electoral ground for its message, which, both externally and domestically, is nationalistic and socially defensive.

Is Austria an exception in its apparent double rejection of Muslim immigration and European integration? Or are we dealing with a broader phenomenon? Yes and no. Clearly quite a few European countries are currently witnessing a rise of discontent, which is finding expression on the margins of the political system. (In fact, the current primaries in the US seem to present a similar picture in America.) The more ‘established’ parties find themselves severely challenged and under pressure. Most of this is coming from the right: the Front National in France, the Alternative für Deutschland in Germany and the Party for Law and Justice in Poland are just very visible examples. But Spain, Italy and even France show that today’s resentment is not the monopoly of the far right; it is also occurring on the left of the spectrum. So far, however, it is only in Austria - and previously in Greece and Central & Eastern Europe - that these movements are on the verge of toppling the traditional balance of power.

Are there common causes for this revolutionary unrest? Of course, local circumstances play a role, and there are also age differences between these protest movements. But generally there appear to be several new lines of conflict that are emerging all over Europe and managing to overshadow the left-right conflict that is institutionalised in most countries’ political systems. Not that right and left have disappeared as distinctive categories, but circumstances have propelled them into new guises. These new juxtapositions appear to result from the dynamic of globalisation. The financial crisis of 2008 symbolised unleashed capitalism, with its deeply undermining effects on employment, social security and a sustainable welfare state. The euro crisis of 2010 prescribed the painful recipe of budget discipline and structural adjustment to keep the common European currency afloat. Modernisation of socioeconomic systems seemed to be inescapable for both the left and the right, helping to blur their distinctive traits. ‘Grand coalitions’ between parties of the right and the left, such as those assembled in countries like Germany, Austria and the Netherlands, although not unsuccessful in their political management, accentuated this fading of ideological differences. Immigration, with its threatening effects on low-skilled labour and social entitlements, added to this development and helped create new political conflicts.

What will be the effects of this erosion of the political ‘centre’? Again, national differences can play a decisive role, for example between Germany and France. But, certainly in the short run, right-wing populist movements can be expected to continue encroaching on the power position of the centre parties. They will do this both by using the existing representative democratic system and by advocating referendums and other forms of ‘direct democracy’. They may be successful in this, even managing to create ‘illiberal democracies’, such as those that have already come into existence in some new EU member states. In response, the established parties will either try to isolate these movements in a powerless ‘quarantine’ or, alternatively, co-opt them into government coalitions and thereby seek to neutralise their electoral attraction. Mobilising the ‘democratic majority’ against the populists or making them part of the ‘system’ could be viable defensive options for the centre parties.

In the longer run it would, however, be more sensible to take people’s concerns and resentments seriously and give them a feasible political expression. This may cause traditional distinctions between left and right to reappear and require realignments on both sides of the political system. The same would need to be achieved within the EU, through enhanced democratisation of Europe.   

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바카라사이트
Wed, 04/22/2020 - 05:04

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On a lighter note I will tell you, that I gave this compliment to a school friend in my class that, “you have inviting eyes” and next day she brought her father to school”. But later became a good friend.
That confusing moment when you dont know what to comment because you know whatever you write it wouldn't be enough.
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카지노사이트
Wed, 04/22/2020 - 05:17

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But if you casually focus on her hair and then complimemt it everytime or just have a look at her hair evertime you meet her... She will really feel that you really like her hair and your compliments were true.
So... Observe her and then compliment her on what you really like :) just don't find the classic lines which generallly are complimented about.
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카지노사이트추천
Wed, 04/22/2020 - 05:26

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Starting from her beauty & sincerity to her serenity & purity is all they want to hear. Compliment them for everything; her eyes, her looks, her nature, her attitude, her dress up etc.
Girls don’t care much about the comment. They care more for the person you are, your character, how you act, how you react etc. To answer what girls like in that is difficult to write because there’s a lot of stuff and it’s explanations are too long.
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Eg:- Be who you are. This is the best advice as well as the worst advice because when you go upto a girl you become different and then you will be the person you are then, the character changes. It shouldn’t and it’s really difficult to explain using words on how to “act normal”. It’s way easier to demonstrate.
Look into her eyes and simply express her about how happy you have felt to spend time with her . 
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바카라사이트
Wed, 04/22/2020 - 05:38

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I can't tell because it depends on girl i mean what's ur relation with her if she is too much bestie , just friend or girfriend , crush etc comment something very pleasant and very casual
I read this really great post once, not too long ago. I can’t find it right now, but if I do I’ll edit this post and include a link so you can see the original thing. But I’ll explain it in my own words.
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